Category Dessert

Root Beer Floats are the Stuff that Toasts are Made Of: Happy National Root Beer Float Day!

Root beer is a wholly American drink because colonists were the first to make it. If you want to believe this, then Charles Hires reintroduced it to America via the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876. He discovered a way to mass-produce them, releasing Hires Root Tea. He likely changed the name from tea to beer to apply to the working class. Did you know that authentic Root beer is from about 16 roots and herbs? The primary ingredient was sassafras. Sassafras came to be known as a carcinogen in1960, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned its use. Root beer accounts for three percent of America’s soft drink market. The number one spot for best-selling root beer is A&W. There is a distilled version of root beer too.

DIY Root Beer Recipe

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 gallon filtered wate...
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The Proof of the Pudding is in the Eating: Happy National Chocolate Pudding Day!

Kathey Jo’s Kitchen is here to tell you all about chocolate pudding. Did you know that it originated from the British Isles, and originated in the late 16th century? It’s a dish to one can make on short notice. The ingredients vary and are versatile at the same time. When introduced to discerning British tongues, it was made up of a sweetened porridge made from flour, tapioca or oatmeal, and milk.

In Colonial America, cornmeal was more readily available and cheaper to boot. It took on the name of hasty pudding and consisted of cornmeal mush (meaning the cornmeal was added to boiling water and cooked) with molasses, honey, brown sugar or maple syrup, and milk.

There are two kinds of puddings: a meat pudding is an example of a savory dish, while in America, it’s mostly known as a dessert...

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Chocolate is One of the Backbones of the Pastry Kitchen: Happy Chocolate Éclair Day!

There are many reasons to enjoy National Chocolate Éclair Day at Kathey Jo’s Kitchen. One of them is the pure deliciousness of it all.

An éclair is an oblong pastry made from choux dough filled with a cream and topped with icing. The éclair originated during the 19th century in France. It was called pain à la Duchesse or petite Duchesse until 1850. The éclair may have gotten its name from the flash of frosting that glistens across its top. When baking the perfect chocolate éclair, steam is essential to the construction of the inner hollow that’s filled with vanilla cream. It takes some patience, but once you’ve perfected your recipe, you’ll have something you can always fall back on for sweetness.

Did you know that MasterChef India pastry experts spent three days constructing a 26-f...

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Strawberries Always Fill My Heart with Joy: Happy National Strawberry Shortcake Day!

It’s that time of year for strawberries! And today at Kathey Jo’s Kitchen, I’m going to tell you all about this versatile fruit. Did you know that shortcake is a sweet biscuit? You make it with flour, sugar, baking powder or soda, salt, butter, milk or cream, and sometimes eggs. Today’s shortcakes use biscuit or sponge cake as the base. In early American recipes, the pie crust was in the round or broken up. This style remains in the South.

What’s great about the shortcake dessert is that you can use peaches, blueberry, chocolate, or any other filling. It’s also common to see a recipe that recommends flavoring the shortcake with coconut. The way that people know shortcake in America varies in the U.K. where it’s known as shortbread.

The most famous dessert is – obviously – strawberry shortc...

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Brown Sugar and Butter and Pecans: Happy National Praline Day!

Praline

Welcome back to Kathey Jo’s Kitchen! The praline is a Southern tradition. You create it with sugar, corn syrup, milk, butter, and pecans. The praline was traced back to Chef Clement Lassagne, who worked for César duc de Choiseul, Comte du Plessis-Praslin around the 17th century.

Chef Lassagne’s original praline recipe brought together almonds bound by a caramelized coating. He named it for his employer, the praslin. Through the centuries in Europe, the Southern praline eventually evolved from the praslin. In France and Belgium, the recipe often features ground nuts and cocoa, instead of a halved nut.

The pralines of today’s SSouth came through New Orleans via Ursuline nuns. These French nuns taught their young charges the domestic arts, which included cooking and baking...

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